Style vs. Substance: Conflicting Cultures in the Cinéma du Look.

La Revue du Cinéma, issue n° 448, May 1989: French film critic Raphaël Bassan classes three filmmakers under the movement title ‘Cinéma du Look’. Luc Besson, of Leon (1994) notoriety and its predecessors Subway (1985) and Nikita (1990); Jean-Jacques Beineix of Betty Blue  (1986) cult fame and the starting point of Cinéma du Look, Diva … Continue reading Style vs. Substance: Conflicting Cultures in the Cinéma du Look.

Weekend (Jean-Luc Godard, 1967) – the sardonic termination of the bourgeoisie.

Colourful yet bleak, violent yet funny, politically critical yet excessively absurd – there are many ways to describe Week End/Weekend, Godard’s scathing critique of the bourgeoisie and social class portrayed through a lens that switches between ludicrous images of cannibalism and obscene amounts of automobile accidents to long monologues of political policies, Marx, and Neo-colonialism. … Continue reading Weekend (Jean-Luc Godard, 1967) – the sardonic termination of the bourgeoisie.

The Devil All the Time (Antonio Campos, 2020) – a confused fizzle rather than a slow burn.

An all-star cast that brings genuinely superb performances to the table doesn’t elevate this film enough to the level it could have achieved. Spanning generations, years, and two rural states; building on the aftereffects of World War 2 and feeling the tense beginnings of the Vietnam War; doused in a thick coating of hyper-religious attitudes … Continue reading The Devil All the Time (Antonio Campos, 2020) – a confused fizzle rather than a slow burn.

Babyteeth (Shannon Murphy, 2019) – the falls, failures, and faults of human mortality.

Young, naïve, and jumping at any opportunity to add some punch to her life before it ends leads the wig-wearing schoolgirl Milla (Eliza Scanlen) into the arms of a chaotic twenty-three year old drug-user named Moses (Toby Wallace). Teenage defiance and a lust for life doesn’t stop the fact that Milla still has one of … Continue reading Babyteeth (Shannon Murphy, 2019) – the falls, failures, and faults of human mortality.

Good Time (Benny and Josh Safdie, 2017)

Two brothers are separated when their bank robbery goes wrong; one lands in jail as the other navigates the manic situations he finds himself in as he tries to get his brother back, all whilst avoiding the police who are actively searching for him. Connie Nikas (Robert Pattinson) is the protective sibling of his mentally-handicapped … Continue reading Good Time (Benny and Josh Safdie, 2017)

Sorry We Missed You (Ken Loach, 2019)

A working-class British family starts to fall apart at the seams when parents Ricky (Kris Hitchen) and Abbie (Debbie Honeywood) begin to struggle more and more to keep financially afloat. The stress of long hours with basically zero benefits doesn't leave time for them to actually be a family to their two children, rebellious teenager … Continue reading Sorry We Missed You (Ken Loach, 2019)

Tomboy (Céline Sciamma, 2011)

It’s the summer holidays, school hasn’t started yet, and ten year-old Laure (Zoé Héran) has moved to a new neighbourhood with her parents and younger sister Jeanne (Malonn Lévanna). School hasn’t begun yet, Laure has no friends, and her heavily pregnant mother (Sophie Cattani) spends her days resting whilst her father (Mathieu Demy) works full-time. … Continue reading Tomboy (Céline Sciamma, 2011)